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Complete Broadway Cast Announced For 'Ain't No Mo'

Photo: Emilio Madrid

Producer Lee Daniels, Academy Award® nominee, announced today the complete casting for the Broadway production of Ain’t No Mo’ playing at the Belasco Theatre beginning on Thursday, November 3 ahead of an official opening on Thursday, December 1.

Joining the previously announced writer Jordan E. Cooper as Peaches, additional cast includes Fedna Jacquet (Passenger #1), Marchánt Davis (Passenger #2), Shannon Matesky (Passenger #3), Ebony Marshall-Oliver (Passenger #4), and Crystal Lucas-Perry (Passenger #5). Understudies are Nik Alexander (u/s Peaches & Passenger #2), Jasminn Johnson (u/s Passenger #3 & Passenger #4), Michael Rishwan (u/s Passenger #2 & Peaches), Kedren Spencer (u/s Passenger #5 & Passenger #1), Brennie Tellu (u/s Passenger #4 & Passenger #5), and Emma Van Lare (u/s Passenger #1 & Passenger #3).

The creative team includes director Stevie Walker-Webb making his Broadway debut, and the design team is three-time Tony Award® winner Scott Pask (scenic design), two-time Tony-nominated Emilio Sosa (costume design), Adam Honoré (lighting design), and Jonathan Deans & Taylor Williams (co-sound design), and Mia M. Neal (wig design). Wagner Johnson Productions serve as Executive Producers and General Management.

Tickets are available via www.aintnomobway.com, www.telecharge.com or by calling 212-239-6200.

Having premiered to overwhelming acclaim at The Public Theater, Ain’t No Mo’ dares to ask the incendiary question, “What if the U.S. government attempted to solve racism … by offering Black Americans one-way plane tickets to Africa?” The answer comes in the form of an outrageous and high-octane comedy about being Black in today’s America. From the mischievous mind of the youngest American playwright in Broadway history, Jordan E. Cooper (“The Ms. Pat Show”), Ain’t No Mo’ seamlessly blends sketch comedy, satire and avant garde theater to leave audiences crying with laughter—and thinking through the tears.

The New York Times heralded Cooper as one of “a generation of Black playwrights whose fiercely political and formally inventive works are challenging audiences, critics, and the culture at large to think about race, and racism, in new ways.”